Eat, think, love

Marije Vogelzang's "Project Christmas Dinner"

Marije Vogelzang’s “Project Christmas Dinner”

To understand what Marije Vogelzang really does — and she does a lot of things — there’s no better example than a project right here in Budapest in 2011.

For her “Eat Love Budapest” exhibit, Vogelzang, the renowned Dutch “eating designer,” erected a few white-cotton cubicles, each almost entirely enclosed. The participant sat down inside amid photos of families and children’s drawings. On one side, the white curtain hung only halfway down. Roma women sat down outside them. As a guitarist walked about playing soft music, the Roma women told stories and fed whomever happened to be inside. [more]

You’ll be surprised to hear what a world-renowned physicist says about what kills creativity

Albert-Lászlo Barabási

In late 2016, Albert-Lászlo Barabási and colleagues published a paper aimed at putting empirical heft behind the anecdotal truism that physicists did their best work when they were young. They considered 2,887 of them, all the way back to 1893, analyzing “impact” papers by age of their progenitor. They found that younger physicists had more impact. But it was because the younger scientists wrote more papers. Age didn’t matter, they concluded.

“The bottom line is: Brother, never give up,” Barabási  told the New York Times. “When you give up, that’s when your creativity ends.”

There’s a bit of irony in Barabási being involved in a paper fueling the professional hopes of the not-young. He had, as Albert Einstein and Marie Curie and many others before him, made enormous scientific contributions while still very young. [more]

This man wants to be the Steve Jobs of robotics

Tomotaka Takahashi and one of his robot creations

Take a close look at your smartphone for a moment.

Unless you’re among the rare Blackberry holdovers or a true clamshell-toting troglodyte, it’s a slab of glass and plastic and/or metal, a plug or two, a couple of camera apertures and a couple of buttons. From the perspectives of design and user interface, your phone is basically the same thing it was years ago.

Considering the gigantic scale of smartphone business, the tight product cycles and the hordes of creative people and engineers working to make the latest and greatest, conventional wisdom says there’s nowhere else to go with smartphone, design-wise. Tomotaka Takahashi would beg to differ. [more]

Graph paper, digital roads, the quirks of proteomes: the future of data

(courtesy Mona Chalabi)

For a sense of Mona Chalabi’s work with data, you could do an author search at her employer’s site, The Guardian, where she’s the data editor. But if you wanted some really fascinating, raw insights, you could go to her Instagram page. There you’ll find handwritten, hand-colored charts, graphs and various other depictions showing such things as American nose jobs by year (which “beaked” at nearly 4 million in 2000); keyboard usage by key (“e” is the English champ); when Americans eat pizza (snacking is the surprising winner); and the top languages by (scarily depicted) native tongues. Chalabi’s interests are far-ranging, and include lots of borderline NSFW data nuggets, too (ideal penis size, farting frequency, orgasm rates and more). While her data sources are digital, her preferred tools are overtly analog: graph paper and colored markers. [more]

A bucket of organs leaves lasting impression

CU School of Medicine Pathologist Carrie Marshall, MD, in the Organ Room of tissues used for training and outreach.

CU School of Medicine Pathologist Carrie Marshall, MD, in the Organ Room of tissues used for training and outreach.

Toni Schoenleber couldn’t do her job as a stroke clinical coordinator at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital if she didn’t have brains. In fact, it’s because she has brains that she knew just where to go when she needed more brains…[more]